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How to create a Stored Procedure

Contents

How to create a Stored Procedure

Stored procedures are one of the mechanisms Openbravo ERP provides in order to implement business logic. Stored procedures are executed by the database engine and are implemented in the standard PL/pgSQL (for PostgreSQL) or PL/SQL (for Oracle) language. One must understand the particularities about how these PL/SQL procedures are integrated with the rest of the application. It is also necessary to follow some coding rules in order to make it possible to export/import to XML files using DBSourceManager.

This document discusses the Openbravo infrastructure for stored PL/SQL procedures. These act as Processes in the Application Dictionary.

AD_PInstance and AD_PInstance_Para tables

Before implementing a PL/SQL procedure it is important to understand how it will be called from the application.

When a PL/SQL procedure is called a new record is created inside the AD_PInstance table. This record contains the information about the ID of the record that the PL/SQL procedure was called from (in case the process is invoked from a button inside a window/tab). This record in the AD_PInstance table is also used by the user interface to retrieve and display the resulting message the procedure generates when it completes (error or success).

In case the process has additional parameters entered by the user a new record is created for each of them inside theAD_PInstance_Para table. Each record contains the information related to one of the parameters such as its name (DB Column name) and the value the user assigned to it.

Finally, note that the ID of the newly created record in AD_PInstance table is the ONLY parameter passed to the PL/SQL procedure. It is the stored procedure's responsibility to read the AD_PInstance and AD_PInstance_Para record(s) to obtain any parameters it requires and writes the resulting message back into the AD_PInstance table.

Procedure definition

The header for a PL/SQL procedure implementing a process looks like:

PostgreSQL

 
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION HR_TEST(p_PInstance_ID character varying) RETURNS void

Oracle

 
CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE HR_TEST(p_PInstance_ID IN VARCHAR2)

First of all take a look to the PL/SQL procedure name, it follows the modularity naming rules, this is, it starts with the module's DBPrefix.

Note that the only parameter the PL/SQL procedure receives is a string one, it will contain the UUID for the key of the AD_PInstance record generated for its invocation.

Retrieving parameters

PostgreSQL and Oracle

 
    SELECT Record_ID, CreatedBy
      INTO v_Record_ID, v_User_ID
      FROM AD_PInstance
     WHERE AD_PInstance_ID = p_PInstance_ID;
     
    FOR Cur_Parameter IN
              (SELECT p.ParameterName,
                      p.P_String,
                      p.P_Number,
                      p.P_Date
              FROM AD_PInstance_Para p
              WHERE AD_PInstance_ID=p_PInstance_ID
              ORDER BY p.SeqNo)
    LOOP
      IF(Cur_Parameter.ParameterName='DateFrom') THEN
        v_DateFrom:=Cur_Parameter.P_Date;
      ELSIF(Cur_Parameter.ParameterName='Activate') THEN
        v_Activate:=Cur_Parameter.P_String;
      END IF;
    END LOOP; -- Get Parameter

The snippet of code above is an example of how the parameters can be retrieved.

The first select obtains from AD_PInstance the IDs (UUIDs) for the user that invoked the process and the record ID it was called from. The record ID only makes sense in case the process is called using a button in a tab. In this case this ID identifies the record in the table that the tab with the button is based on. This is used for processes that affect the current record.

Afterwards, a loop obtains all the parameters and iterates only in case the process has parameters defined. Notice that the parameter is identified by ParameterName which matches DB Column name defined in the parameter. Depending on its type the actual value is stored in one of the following columns: P_String, P_Number or P_Date. The stored procedure needs to know what to expect and retrieve it accordingly.

Updating AD_PInstance

AD_PInstance table has a IsProcessing column, which indicates whether an instance is currently being processed or not. At the beginning of the process the instance should be set as processing with:

 
  AD_UPDATE_PINSTANCE(p_PInstance_ID, NULL, 'Y', NULL, NULL);

Once the process is finished, the instance should be set again to not processing. Not only that, this instance will be used to display the result of the process which will be shown in the user interface. This is done with:

 
  AD_UPDATE_PINSTANCE(p_PInstance_ID, v_User_ID, 'N', v_Result, v_Message);

Here the v_Result parameter is a numeric value, it can be 0 for error or 1 for success. The v_Message is the message that will be shown, for further information about how to manage messages read the section below.

Managing exceptions

The exceptions in a PL/SQL procedure should be captured in order to insert the proper message in the PInstance table to be correctly displayed to the user. Thus is a good practice to have an EXCEPTION section to catch all the exceptions in the body of the procedure.

This would be a complete procedure with the EXCEPTION section.

PostgreSQL

 
  CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION HR_TEST(p_PInstance_ID character varying) RETURNS void AS
  $BODY$ 
  
  BEGIN
    -- Your code here
  
  EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
      v_ResultStr:= '@ERROR=' || SQLERRM;
      RAISE NOTICE '%',v_ResultStr ;
      IF(p_PInstance_ID IS NOT NULL) THEN
        PERFORM AD_UPDATE_PINSTANCE(p_PInstance_ID, NULL, 'N', 0, v_ResultStr) ;
      END IF;
      RETURN;
    END ; $BODY$
  LANGUAGE 'plpgsql' VOLATILE

Oracle

 
  CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE HR_TEST(p_PInstance_ID IN VARCHAR2) AS
  
  BEGIN
  
  -- Your code here
  
  EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
       v_ResultStr:= '@ERROR=' || SQLERRM;
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(v_ResultStr) ;
        IF(p_PInstance_ID IS NOT NULL) THEN
          ROLLBACK;
          AD_UPDATE_PINSTANCE(p_PInstance_ID, NULL, 'N', 0, v_ResultStr) ;
        ELSE
          RAISE;
        END IF;
  END HR_TEST;


As all exceptions in the body are caught to correctly take the message from it and add it to the PInstance setting it to result 0 (error), it is possible to raise custom exceptions when some logical error happens during the execution, because they will also be caught. For example the following piece of code does some checks and in case they fail an exception is thrown.

PostgreSQL

  
  IF checkFails THEN
    RAISE EXCEPTION '%', '@HR_SomeNiceMessage@'; 
  END IF;

Oracle

 
  IF checkFails THEN
    RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(-20000, '@HR_SomeNiceMessage@');
  END IF;

For further explanations on messages read the Messages documentation.

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